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Parrish, Paris, Patrice, Patrick, Fitzpatrick, Kilpatrick, Aparicio Surnames and variants

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Parrish, Paris, Patrice, Patrick, Fitzpatrick, Kilpatrick, Aparicio Surnames and variants

Group for researching the Parrish, Paris, Patrice, Patrick, Fitzpatrick, Kilpatrick, Aparicio Families and variant spellings. Post your information or questions in the group's discussion forum.

Members: 8
Latest Activity: Apr 10, 2013

Parrish
English (mainly southern): from the Old French habitational name and personal name Paris (see Paris 1). Parrish is the most common form of the name in English, and is the result of confusion between -s and -sh (compare Norris), reinforced by folk etymological association with the modern English word parish. In the 17th and 18th centuries the surname was occasionally bestowed on foundlings brought up at the expense of the parish.

Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-4

Paris
French, English, and German: from the medieval personal name Paris, which is actually an Old French variant of Patrice (see Patrick), but which became associated with the name of the Trojan prince Paris in Homer’s Iliad.
French, English, and German: habitational name from the French city of Paris or a nickname denoting someone who had Parisian connections, for example through trade.
Catalan (París): from a reduced form of the personal name Aparici, which was given to children born on the Feast of the Epiphany, 6th January (see Aparicio).
Hungarian (Páris): from the personal name Páris or Párizs.

Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-4

Patrick
Scottish and Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Phádraig ‘son of Patrick’, a personal name derived from Latin Patricius ‘son of a noble father’, ‘member of the patrician class’. This was the name of a 5th-century Romano-Briton who became the apostle and patron saint of Ireland, and it was largely as a result of his fame that the personal name was so popular from the Middle Ages onward. In Ireland the surname is usually Scottish in origin, but it is also found as a shortened form of Mulpatrick and Fitzpatrick.

Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-4

Fitzpatrick
Irish: occasionally this may be a genuine Anglo-Norman French patronymic (see Fitzgerald) from the personal name Patrick, but more often it has been adopted as an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Pádraig (see Kilpatrick).

Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-4

Kilpatrick
Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Phádraig ‘son of the servant of (Saint) Patrick’ (Irish Pádraig).
Scottish: habitational name from any of various places named in Gaelic as cill Padraig ‘church of (Saint) Patrick’.

Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-4

Aparicio
Portuguese and Spanish: from a personal name, bestowed especially on children born on or around the Feast of the Epiphany (6 January), Spanish Aparición, which celebrates the appearance of Christ to the Magi. The Spanish vocabulary word aparición means ‘appearance’ or ‘manifestation’. In Portugal and Spain, however, this is found as a forenames only, not a surname.

Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-4

Discussion Forum

Almedia Parrish and Henry Laishley

Started by Janet MacDougall Apr 10, 2013.

Pvt. Parris W. Bellinger, 103rd Regt. .S. Colored Infanry, Co. F

Started by James Alfred Locke Miller Jr. Feb 17, 2011.

 

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