Genealogy Wise

The Genealogy & Family History Social Network

I'd love to talk with anyone about Georgia's part in the American Revolution, especially Col. Elijah Clarke, Col. Stephen Heard, Col. Micajah Williamson, Maj. Barnard Heard, and anyone else who served with this band of patriots who fought the Redcoats and Indians at Kettle Creek, Augusta and Wilkes County and help create the State of Georgia.

Views: 8067

Replies to This Discussion

Hi,

I am not extremely knowledgeable about any of the above. But, I do know that Johann Peter Strozier fought under them, and that in his wifes Rev War Pension Application there is mention of them as well as Paddy Carr. Both were definitely at the Battle of Kettle Creek and at the battle of Kings Mountain in NC. I have a few records, and would be glad to share what little I know.

Cheryl
Col Elijah Clarke-was over several of my Ancestors-and lots I have worked with-
General Elijah Clark born 1733 Edgecombe Co NC died 15 Jan 1799 Richmond Co. Ga. He is supposed to have married Edgecombe 1765-Hannah Harrington or Arrington (Have seen both) They had 9 known children- More on all but Susan and Gibson -Congressman & Lawyer.
1764 Elijah was listed as buyer at estate sales of two planters Walter Gibson and Robert Lee..who
lived along the Rocky Run where he lived. Near the PeeDee River.
1771 Abt. Elijah and wife moved family sw to Pacolet River where they
settled on part of a 800 acre land grant obtained by Elijah's Father in
1755. Located along a part of the River known as Grindle Shoals, n of
present day Spartanburg SC. The Hays biography of Elijah says that he found the Pacolet
property swampy and unsatisfactory for farming. Another account
suggest that he was always a better hunter than farmer.
(Biographies suggest he lived in Edgecombe CO NC from the time he was born
until he married. He probably did live there, but left for Anson Co NC)
1773 He moved further south to the northern border area of Ga. St Paul's
Parish along the Wahatchee Creek near the new Quaker settlement of New Purchase later known as
Wrightsborough.
GEORGIA PIONEERS May 1879 Vol XVI #2-Cover Picture & page 50- Mary Carter Pub.
During the tumultuous time of 1773 to 1779 Wilkes Co became known as "The Hornet's Nest" .
Examination of only a small portion of the documents still in existence from those dark days reveal
the courage and leadership ability of Elijah Clark, the "Hero of Hornet's Next.".
An interesting Commemoration Bookley on the 200th Anniversary of the Battle of Kettle Creek has
been compiled by Robert Scott Davis, Jr. and may be ordered from____(too old to be true)
The importance of this battle was expressed years later by Gen. Andrew Pickens, veteran of many
hard faught battles,w hen he said, "the Battle of Kettle Creek was the severest check and
chastisement of Tories ever received in South Carolina or Georgia."
1773 Sep. 27 A list of Persons who have applied to the Commissioners appointed by his excellence Sir
James Wright, Barronet, to receive vouchers and have obtained liberty to Settle on the lands ceded
by His Majesty Sep. 27. List Elijah Clark, James and Richard Aycock, Thomas and Jacob
Hollingsworth, Absolom Beddel and others. Family Puzzlers #1167 page 4
1782-Georgia passed a number of headright laws, but it was in 1782 that headrights were
granted, almost all to those who fought for the state during the Revolution.
Revolutionary War soldiers merely had to bring a piece of paper signed by their
commanding officer to get a headright grant (grant size depended on the time the
paper was turned in and the rank of the soldier). The practice was almost immediately
corrupted by some very prominent men including Elijah Clark, Edward Telfair and
Ignatius Few, who signed vouchers for men who would claim headright land then
deed it to their former commanders.
Moved to Wilks, Georgia. Resided 7 miles Northwest of Washington, between the roads
leading from Broad River & the Cherokee Corner to Augusta.
First Settlers of Upper Georgia - Pages 154 through 156.
The tories fled among the neighboring Indian tribes and excited their warrors to plunder and murder
the frontier people, until Elijah Clark, aided by his son, frightened them away by the great victory
which he obtained over them at Jack's Creek. Elijah Clark had but little scholastic learning, nor had
he been very accurately taught in early youth the distinction between right and wrong. He was poor
when he took to Soldiering. He reversed the Law of Kings that the people and their property are
theirs by his verdict, that what was claimed by the King should belong to the people. King George
whilst Georgia was a Colony, granted his lands so that when they became Freemen and the State
under their Government, they made Amends to themselves by granting to everyone land for little or
nothing. The riches grew upon whilst it fed on. Elijah Clark, and the other North Carolina Settlers in
Wilks, Georgia FAILING to get enough to satisfy their voracity took POSSESSION of the Fertile
Territory between OCONEE and OCMULGEE RIVERS, WITHOUT REGARD to the OCCUPANT
RIGHTS OF THE INDIANS, established a Republic made ELIJAH CLARK their Chief Ruler and were
preparing to PARCEL out the lands when the MILITIA ordered into service by Governor Mathews,
and the regular Troops by President George Washington DROVE THEM OFF.
REFERENCE: "THE PATRIOT RESOURCE HISTORY"
BY AUTHOR SCOTT CUMMINGS.
Elijah Clarke was born and grew up in South Carolina, probably of Scottish-Irish parents. He
eventually migrated to Wilkes County, Georgia and joined the militia shortly before the American
Revolution broke out. He began the war serving with Andrew Pickens. He saw action in various
skirmishes and small battles at Alligator Creek, Kettle Creek, Green Spring, Cedar Springs and
Musgrove's Mill.
In September 1780, Colonel Clarke is part of a failed attempte to retake Augusta, Georgia, an event
which reignites Loyalist vengence in Georgia. He then saw action with Thomas Sumter against Lt.
Colonel Banastre Tarleton at Blackstocks. In April 1781, Clarke and Andrew Pickens began a
successful siege of Augusta, which ended in June. After the war, he remained in the militia and
fought Indians in 1781.
Clarke was given a plantation, later defeating Indians again and retired a Brigadier General. He
next began service with the French minister to the US in a scheme to gain control of West Florida.
1794, he set up the short lived Transoconee Republic. Later on, he was rumored to be involved with
new schemes over West Florida and the Yazoo Land Fraud, but in spite of all his dubious postwar
pursuits, he died in 1799 still a revered hero.
Early Life: 1733-1776
Elijah Clarke was born and grew up in South Carolina, probably of Scottish-Irish parents. In 1774,
he migrated to Wilkes County, Georgia, because of the availability of new lands. Soon after, the
region was threatened by Indians. A militia company was organized and Clarke was elected
captain. This was just the beginning of his military career.
Revolutionary War: 1776-1781
When the war broke out, Clarke joined the Whigs (Patriots). He was given the commission of Lt.
Colonel and served with Andrew Pickens. In July 1778, he was wounded at Alligator Creek. On
February 14, 1779, he was with Pickens when his force of about 300 surprised and defeated about
700 Loyalists under Colonel Boyd after about an hour of fighting at Kettle Creek, Georgia. The
victory stopped the rallying of Loyalists following the British capture of Savannah, Georgia. It turned
out to be the high point of Patriot action in Georgia during the war and forced the British to
withdraw from Augusta.
In May, 1780, Augusta again fell under British control. During this time while the state is under
British control, Colonel Clarke carried on resistance in the backcountry using guerilla tactics. His
militia skirmished with and drove back an advance party of Loyalists from Major Patrick Ferguson's
main force at Green Spring, South Carolina on August 1, 1780. On August 8, he and Colonel Isaac
Shelby skirmished with Ferguson at Cedar Springs. On August 18, they again skirmished with
Partisans at the rear of Ferguson's force at Musgrove's Mill, South Carolina where they repulsed a
Loyalist attack inflicting 150 casualties and capturing 70, while sustaining only a dozen casualties
themselves.
From September 14-18, 1780, Colonel Clarke and Lt. Colonel James McCall led over 400 men in
an attempt to retake Augusta, Georgia. They began the siege by approaching undetected and
rebuffed two Indian attacks. On the 15th, they brought in two artillery pieces, their only qualified
artillerist was killed early that same day. Even though they had cut off the British water supply, they
had insufficient numbers to overrun the garrison. On the 18th, Clarke withdrew when British
reinforcements arrived from Ninety-Six. The attempted siege brought about a violent reaction from
Loyalists and 400 women and children were forced to flee with the force toward North Carolina.
Major Ferguson's pursuit of this force precipitated events that led to the Battle of King's Mountain.
Colonel Clarke may or may not have been with Thomas Sumter at Fishdam Ford, South Carolina
on November 9, 1780 when his camp was attacked by Major James Wemyss, On November 20,
Clarke joined Sumter in fighting Lt. Colonel Banastre Tarleton at Blackstocks, South Carolina. The
battle was a virtual draw with Tarleton preventing Sumter from threatening Ninety-Six, but losing
the field and the battle to do so. Sumter was severly wounded at this action, which resulted in the
dispersion of his militia. In April 1781, Clarke and Pickens began a second siege of Augusta,
Georgia with the support of Lt. Colonel Henry Lee and his Legion and Colonel Shelby. On June 5,
Augusta finally fell, returning the backcountry of Georgia to Patriot control.
http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3252011&...
1787- He commanded the battle of Jack's Creek.
1791 Feb. 26 Wilkes Co. Ga.
Elijah Clark personally appeared before me and swore that he saw Thomas Harrington and Sara
Harrington sign, seal and then act and deed and deliver the within instument (a copy of 7 Dec
1771) deed to Alston Clark) In writing and that he saw Jedum Gibson and Hannah Clark (Wife of
Elijah) Sign the same and witness.
They had 9 children. 8 Survived to adulthood.
The American Revolution in Georgia Battle of Kettle Creek
The backwoods of Georgia holds challenges for the British Army in Georgia. Many people in
Georgia are strongly anti-British, so when Colonel James(?) Boyd and 700 loyalists set up camp
along Kettle Creek on February 14, 1779, they know to be prepared for an attack.
Only a couple of days before, on February 11, 100 Patriots attack them while crossing Van(n)'s
Creek in spite of being outnumbered.
Things were not going well for these Loyalists. Boyd is expecting additional men to assist in a
strike against the Patriots. His men are not regulars and dissention fills the ranks. And the
skirmish at Vann's Creek alert Colonels John Dooly and Andrew Pickens to the Loyalist's
presence in Wilkes County. As was the custom, the Loyalist send scavengers out to find food.
This morning about 150 men are out searching for food when Pickens attacks.
With a combined total of 340 men, the Patriots attack in three columns, Col. Dooly on the right,
Pickens in the middle and Elijah Clark, Dooly's second in command on the left. A small advance
guard is sent in front of the columns to scout the enemy. Col. Pickens scouts are surprised by
Boyd's Loyalist sentries and open fire.
Alerted to the attack by the sound of gunfire, Boyd rallies his men and advances with a small
group to the top of a nearby hill, where they wait behind rocks and fallen trees for the Patriots.
To the left and right the men under command of Dooly and Clarke have problems crossing the
high water of the creek and nearby swamps.
Pickens continues his advance to the fence on top of the hill, where Boyd's men await the
advancing Americans. On the approach of Pickens, the Loyalists open fire. Men at the lead of
the column fall victim to the first rounds. Clarke and Dooly, unable to advance > quickly through
the cane, are helpless. By all accounts, outnumbered and caught by surprise, the Patriots are
losing the battle.
After the successful ambush, Boyd orders his men to retreat to the camp by Kettle Creek. In
one of those events frequently labeled as fate, Boyd falls to the ground, dying from a musket
ball. Seeing this, his troops panic and an orderly withdrawal turns into a nightmare for the 600
men under his command.
Pickens rallies and advances his men towards the Loyalist camp. At the same time Dooly's men
emerge from the swamp. Surrounded on three fronts, with the creek to their back, about 450
Tories follow Boyd's second in command, Major Spurgen, across Kettle Creek.
While they are crossing the creek, Lt. Col Elijah Clarke emerges on the other side and charges
with 50 men. The Loyalists flee, soundly defeated. Total losses: Loyalist 40-70 dead, 70
captured, Patriots 9 dead, 23 wounded.

The men who flee the battlefield eventually make their way back to Wrightsville, although some
are captured and hang later that year. Pickens, who became famous for his many battles in the
Revolution would later write that Kettle Creek was the "severest chastisement" for the Loyalists
in South Carolina and Georgia. Dooly is later brutally murdered by British Regulars.


http://ngeorgia.com/revolution/amrev11.html
');
The backwoods of Georgia holds challenges for the British Army in Georgia. Many people in Georgia are strongly anti-British, so when Colonel James(?) Boyd and 700 loyalists set up camp along Kettle Creek on February 14, 1779, they know to be prepared for an attack. Only a couple of days before, on February 11, 100 Patriots attack them while crossing Van(n)'s Creek in spite of being outnumbered.
Things were not going well for these Loyalists. Boyd is expecting additional men to assist in a strike against the Patriots. His men are not regulars and dissention fills the ranks. And the skirmish at Vann's Creek alert Colonels John Dooly and Andrew Pickens to the Loyalist's presence in Wilkes County. As was the custom, the Loyalist send scavengers out to find food. This morning about 150 men are out searching for food when Pickens attacks.

With a combined total of 340 men, the Patriots attack in three columns, Col. Dooly on the right, Pickens in the middle and Elijah Clark, Dooly's second in command on the left. A small advance guard is sent in front of the columns to scout the enemy. Col. Pickens scouts are surprised by Boyd's Loyalist sentries and open fire.
Alerted to the attack by the sound of gunfire, Boyd rallies his men and advances with a small group to the top of a nearby hill, where they wait behind rocks and fallen trees for the Patriots. To the left and right the men under command of Dooly and Clarke have problems crossing the high water of the creek and nearby swamps.
Pickens continues his advance to the fence on top of the hill, where Boyd's men await the advancing Americans. On the approach of Pickens, the Loyalists open fire. Men at the lead of the column fall victim to the first rounds. Clarke and Dooly, unable to advance quickly through the cane, are helpless. By all accounts, outnumbered and caught by surprise, the Patriots are losing the battle.
After the successful ambush, Boyd orders his men to retreat to the camp by Kettle Creek. In one of those events frequently labeled as fate, Boyd falls to the ground, dying from a musket ball. Seeing this, his troops panic and an orderly withdrawal turns into a nightmare for the 600 men under his command.
Pickens rallies and advances his men towards the Loyalist camp. At the same time Dooly's men emerge from the swamp. Surrounded on three fronts, with the creek to their back, about 450 Tories follow Boyd's second in command, Major Spurgen, across Kettle Creek.
While they are crossing the creek, Lt. Col Elijah Clarke emerges on the other side and charges with 50 men. The Loyalists flee, soundly defeated. Total losses: Loyalist 40-70 dead, 70 captured, Patriots 9 dead, 23 wounded.
The men who flee the battlefield eventually make their way back to Wrightsville, although some are captured and hang later that year. Pickens, who became famous for his many battles in the Revolution would later write that Kettle Creek was the "severest chastisement" for the Loyalists in South Carolina and Georgia. Dooly is later brutally murdered by British Regulars.




Marie Doster Parks 288 Danielsville St. Jefferson Ga. 30549 wanted to contact Gen. Elijah Clarke descendants Mar. 97.

John Brown, born in Scotland, came to America in 1748 and settled in Anson
Co, NC where he married in 1754 Rebeckah Yates, a Scottish woman. Removed
to St. George's Parish, GA in 1774. (Afterwards Burke Co)

He served as a private in the Burke Co. Militia under Col John Twiggs and
after the British overran his section of the state in 1780 he, with many
other Burke Co men, joined the command of Col Elijah Clark. There was a
furlough signed by Col Twiggs Sep 1779 allowing John to go home and search
for stolen horses.

John Brown Jr. was killed at the battle of Eutaw, SC and his brother Jesse
was captured by the British and all his life bore a scar on his face from
a sword of a British officer after refusing to saddle the officer's horse.

Also shown died Wilkes buried Marietta, Cobb- same National Cem.
And another ancestry entry says first buried at Lincolnton- MOVED to Woodburn then MOVED to National Cemetery Ms Gerry Hill-Albany Ga
Ms. Gerry Hill, your post is quite interesting to me. There are several names that are also in my family, mainly surnames.

My fifth great grandfather, Joseph Irby b. 1728, was killed in the Massacre of Hayes Station led by the Tory Bloody Bill Cunningham. Also killed was a son, Joseph Jr,. a nephew, Grief Irby, and about 14-16 others. They are buried in a mass grave in Laurens Co., SC near the Newberry Co. border. There is a nice DAR tombstone there.

Joseph was married to someone thought to be Mary Frances Carter Irby. She is listed as Mary Carter in DAR. Descendents of Joesph's son, William who also served in the Revolution and signed up when the family lived in Halifax Co., VA, have several lineages posted with the DAR. I have been looking for the parents of both Joseph and "Mary" Frances Carter. They moved their family to Newberry County, SC in 1778 from Halifax Co., VA. They had also lived in Halifax Co., NC shortly after their marriage c. 1747 (Halifax Co., NC was taken from Edgecombe Co., NC). Joesph was thought to be living near his brother, William who married Elizabeth ____. When this William died c. 1765, Joseph and Frances moved to Halifax Co., VA.

I do have a copy of Frances Irby's will c. 1797. She does not mention the son William in her will who was living nearby at the time, but it does seem that she mentions Joesph Jr, along with her other sons and one daughter, including my 4th great grandfather, Henry, who had died by this time. (Frances left his wife land according to a line run during Henry's lifetime). Three of Joseph and Francis Irby's children married Henderson sisters, daughters of Capt. James and Ann Henderson. The Hendersons lived in Laurens Co., SC, not far from the site of the massacre. They moved to SC from Granville Co., NC in 1772. Capt. James and Ann had a son, James, who I have not located, but it seems other researchers may have.

I did find a Joseph and Elizabeth Carter living near Halifax Co., VA, but he did not seem old enough to be Frances' father, but possibly a brother. How far back do you go with your Carters? And what part of VA or NC did they come from?

I've also seen the pension of William, Joseph's son. William didn't need a pension so did not file for one, I am supposing. It was filed after his death by two of his sons, one being a lawyer and another being a doctor. Although I'm glad they did this, I don't know what their motive would have been. At any rate in the pension, it mentions as heirs: The children of Joseph and Frances Carter Irby. (This is just handwritten somewhere that seems unofficial, but seems proof that this William was a son of Joseph definitely, and possibly Frances. The reason I wrote that is that I have wondered if Joseph married Mary Carter first, and then Frances Unknown (because she did not mention William in her will....possibly he had already received something or did not need anything). So this is why I am looking for Carter's. Frances always used the name Frances, never Mary, as listed in DAR. Her name could have been Mary Frances. So I am interested in how far you've gone back with your Carters, and also the James Henderson you mentioned. How much do you know about him?

I also have a 6th? great grandfather named Walter Gibson who moved to Wilkes Co., GA from NC...it seems Anson Co. He was acquainted with the family of Gen. Elijah Clark. Do you know much about him or his ancestors? It seems that he had a land deal with Elijah. I know my Hogans did who also lived in Wilkes Co. c. 1785 to 1803 (possibly moving before 1785...that's just when my 4th great grandfather, John Hogan first appears in the records there). This Hogan family also lived in the same county as Elijah Clark in NC prior to moving to Wilkes Co., but can find no evidence that they served in the Revolution. My 4th great grandfather was John Hogan who married Sarah Culpepper.

Thanks for your response. Linda Graves
Possibly the same family- Stephen Heard died 29 Oct 1774 Pittsylvania Co Va and had Thomas Rev Capt. born 1742 same-died 17 Jan 1808 Greene Co Ga He married into the Fitzpatrick family, which married into my Brown's
Ms. Gerry Hill Albany Ga
Are you related to Col. Stephen Heard of "Heardmont" in Elbert County, Georgia, who fought in the Revolution?
Again-not my ancestor:
Micajah born 28 Jan 1744 James River, Buckingham, Va died 12 Dec 1796 Washington, Wilkes, Ga
He is said to have married 1765 in Va Sara "Sally" Gillam and had 7 children. More on all but Peter Ballentine-Methodist Minister.
Notes on him:
Micajah Williamson moved from Albemarle County, VA, to Wilkes County, GA, in either 1766 or 1767. A fire destroyed their home in western Georgia. The family found refuge in the mountains of North Carolina for a while. They then settled permanently in Wilkes County, GA.

He served as a lieutenant colonel under General Elijah Clarke in the South Carolina Regiment. Prior to the Revolutionary War, Micajah saw action against the Cherokee Indians at Nomencee. He protected the western frontier of Georgia. Micajah saw action at Alligator Creek, Kettle Creek, Musgrove's Mill, and Long Cane. All of these Revolutionary War battles occured in Georgia. Micajah also saw action at the Battle of King's Mountain in North Carolina.

On 30 June 1778, a force of 300 American cavalry commanded by Elijah Clarke participated in General Robert Howe's invasion of British Florida. The Americans attacked the British at Alligator Creek Bridge but were unable to penetrate the entrenchments near-by. In the entrenchment were 450 British regular soldiers and South Carolina Royalists. During this skirmish, Col. Clarke was wounded. The Americans withdrew and the British drew back to the St. Johns River.

The Battle of Kettle Creek was fought on 14 February 1779 on the border between Georgia and South Carolina. Georgia was almost entirely under British control. Colonel Boyd led 600 British Royalists across the Savannah River and into Elbert County. Col. Andrew Pickens of the REvolutionary forces had 200 militiamen from South Carolina along with Elijah Clarke's 140 militiamen from Georgia. The two combined forces and marched to meet the Royalists. The battle raged for over three hours before the Royalists fled. Colonel Boyd and 20 of his men were killed. 22 Royalists were captured. It is said that the Battle of Kettle Creek "was the severest check and chastisement the Tories ever received in South Carolina or Georgia."

The Battle for Musgrove's Mill was fought on 18 August 1780. Clarke skirmished with the Royalists there en route to Augusta.

The Battle of King's Mountain was fought on 7 October 1780. Following the surrender at Charleston in May 1780, the British had overrun South Carolina. Isaac Shelby put together a group of men from "over the mountain". The men climbed over the snow covered mountains and began to advance upon British Major Patrick Ferguson's men. Ferguson denounced the colonists as "backwater men ... a set of mongrels." He reached King's Mountain on 6 October where he camped. Some 400 South Carolinians, including Micajah Williamson, joined the "Over the Mountain Men" at Cowpens, SC, on 6 October. The men marched all night through pouring rain. It was noon when they arrived at King's Mountain. The Royalists were taken by surprise. Col. Ferguson was killed after an hour battle. The British surrendered. Over 225 Loyalists had been killed, 163 wounded, and 716 taken prisoner. The Colonists lost only 28 men.

The Battle of Cowpens was fought on 17 January 1781.

When the British forces occupied Augusta in 1780, Colonel Micajah Williamson was listed as one who was "obnoxious to the Crown." He was named a rebel general in the Revolutionary Army. Along with Elijah Clarke, Williamson was part of the victory of the patriots over the British at Augusta on 5 June 1781.

From Micajah and his wife Sarah came an extraordinary number of famous people. U.S. Supreme Court Justic John Archibald Campbell was the son of their daughter Mary. Another daughter, Susannah, was the grandmother of U.S. Supreme Court Justic Lucius Q.C. Lamar. A third daughter, Nancy, was married to John Clarke, Governor of Georgia. Micajah's son Peter was a Methodist preacher known as "the Marrying Preacher."

Micajah was one of the commissioners who authorized the establishment and construction of the Wilkes Academy in 1797. It was authorized in 1783 as the first public school chartered by the State of Georgia.

Sources: Linda Huggins, Frank Oliver Clark, Dave Williamson, Daughters of the American Revolution, Sons of the American Revolution, George S. Scheer, Loreen Thurman.




I had William and William Fluker in his Miss. Pedigree said Micajah.
17th Century Isle of Wight Co., Va. by Boddie
Old Free State P 375 by Jandon C Bell
Diary John Coffee Williamson 1840-1877
Line of JIBJR485@aol.com. Rev. Sol.
Quaker from Louisa Co. Va.


Other children
William 2 Apr 1766 Va
Charles 23 Mar 1768 Wilkes Co Ga
Micajah 17 Feb 1770 Wilkes
Martha 24 Nov 1781 Wil
Th. Jeff 1782 Wilkes
Mary born 15 Feb 1788 Wilkes d 1862
Mary Williamson was known as Polly. She was introduced to Duncan Campbell by her sister Sarah; Sarah's husband, Judge John Griffin, was tutoring Duncan Campbell in law. The couple courted for a year.
Mary and Duncan bought a home two miles east of Washington in Wilkes County, GA, in 1818. They named it Fontainbleau. The plantation house was built in the Italian villa style. "Fontainbleau was a plantation of singular beauty ... Mary Campbell worked diligently to make the estate greatly adorned and cultured. Near the front of the beautiful grounds, made lovely by flowing streams, lawns of Kentucky grass and every variety of foliage and shrub ... arose the capricious dwelling built in the style of an Italian villa with surrounding verandas. The fields and pastures were well stocked with flocks and herds and there were also broad acres of grain and cotton. For the next decade, the Campbells hosted scores of travelers and visitors... The hospitality shown at Fontainbleau was exceptional, even in the hospitable South. Mary Campbell singlehadedly managed the estate whenever Duncan Campbell's business and political activities kept him away from home which occurred more often as his reputation spread and his business affairs improved"
Fontainbleau was sold in 1829 after Duncan Greene Campbell's death.

Source: Robert Saunders, "John Archibald Campbell: Southern Moderate", pp. 3-4


http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=kath... Ms, Gerry Hill-Albany Ga
I've been to the Battle of Kettle Creek. I don't believe it is on the border to SC. Any one out there who knows for sure. I do think it may have been in a neighboring county to SC...or nearby.
Kettle Creek is located west of Washington in Wilkes County. It was a long way from the state line. This area in and around Wilkes County was known as the "Hornet's Nest", protected by the citizens and militia leaders including Clark and Williamson. This area of Georgia was never under British rule. Everything north and west of Augusta was like walking into a Hornet's Nest for the British. If the Red Coats tried, they were easily defeated, just like at Kettle Creek.
Attachments:
Gerry,

Are you related to the Micajah Williamson family, or just a fan of this interesting family? I noticed you referenced a "dave Williamson" above as a source. Is he a descendant? Do you have any contact information on descendants of the Williamson Family? I've been researching this family in detail for quite some time at archives and courthouses, have the books you referenced above, and been to the grave of Col. Micajah Williamson in Wilkes County, but never found any descendants of his interested in research. any help or guidance would be greatly appreciated.
My Ancestor-Josiah Carter-served under Col Elijah Clarke-
He was born 10 Feb 1745 Bedford Co Va died 10 Sep 1822 Putnam Co. Ga. He was earlier in WIlkes-
He married Mary Menges Anthony- whose Father Joseph Anthony also served (more on his BiograhyP and Elizabeth Ann Clark.

Notes on Josiah:

GEORGIA'S ROSTER OF THE REVOLUTION (compiled under Authority of The Legislature by Lucian
Lamar Knight Gen Pub. 1967 Josiah Carter
One DAR # is 579918.
Colonial Soldiers of the South 1732-1774 Josiah, John Carter
WILKES- MISC. RECORDS OF WIKES CO GA VOL III
John (Several including John L & John S), James
EARLY RECORDS OF GA Vol I & II (Wilkes)
John (Several), James, Josiah
GEORGIA NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS Putnam Co. Extracts Vol I 1809-1834 Tad Evans
John pg 169,493,671,683,695,705,755
Served as a private in Ga Line under Col Elijah Clark..Georgia Roster of Rev. P 378 copied from papers in office of Sec of State..Private Josiah Carter.
1771-Jun 26-Josiah Married Mary Anthony in Bedford Va (Adj. Pittsylvania)
1772-William & Mary Quarterly Vol i Book II page 251-Josiah security for James Anthony marriag bond-
he was his new brother-in-law
1772-Pittsylvania Court orderbook-Josiah Sues John Carter-Suit dismissed
1772-Sep. 10 Joseph-son of Jisiah & Mary born
1773-Dec. 20-Deed Book 10 page 446.. Goochland Co.-Baynes Carter of Pittsylvania deed to Samuel Coleman Morris.
Land he inherited from Th. Carter.
1774-May 17- Elizabeth dtr. of Josiah & Mary born
1776-May 17 Sara dtr of Josiah born
He werved under Coloniel Elijah Clarke
DAR #194758
Record of Ga by L.L. Knight pages 378,342
Ga Land Grants Vol II Page 527 Certified List of Reb Soldiers compiled by Capt. J.T. Johnson
for Lottery List 1827
McCall's Ga Roster, Page 49
1777-Apr. - Mary Carter born
1777-Deed Bk 1 page 81 Henry Co. Th. M. Randolph of Goocland to Josiah Carter of Pittsylvania Co.
and located mouth of Reed Creek & Irvin River (Later changed to Smith River) Josiah build a Griss
mill.
1777- Aug 30-Henry Co Va-Josiah and Baynes Co. took Oath of Allegience-Va. Mag & Hist. Bio. Vol 9 p 17
1778- original grant- From THWEATT FAMILY HISTORY page 76 Deed book FF 1788 p 28 Josiah Carter and
wife Mary to James Thweatt 195 acres on Ogeechee River original grant 1787 to said Josiah dated 5 Jul 1778.
Henry Co. formed 1776 from Bedford and Pitts. Deed Jul 31 1778 to Josiah Carter and Bayne s Carter...land Grant
Oct 20 1778 to Josiah Carter on both sides of Blackwater River.
1778-Deed bk 1 pg 166 Henry Co. Josiah sold part of Reed Creek property to Baynes. Mary signed.
1778-Jan. Josiah Carter born
1778-Apr. 20-Henry Co. County Levy made Josiah guarding 2 days 50 (Va Mag of Hist & Bio. Vol 9 p 265)
1779-Order Bk 2 Pg. 50 Josiah applies for leave to build Griss Mill on Reed River
1780-Court Order Book 2 pg 70 Josiah contracts to construck 24 x 20 log Courthouse 9 ceiling
with 2 1/2 from ground w/21 Square peg shingles. (First county Courthouse)
1780- Aug Henry Co sold at Court House-grain- 5 bbls. L 45 Vol I p 334 Spefic Taxes Va Mag of Hist
1782-May 31 Christopher A. Carter born-
1782-87- Va Tax Payers Henry Co Josiah Carter 6 slaves
1783-Deed Bk 2 page 40 Henry Co. Josiah ded to George Waller lands on Reed Creek adj. Baynes. Mary wife of
1784-Apr 2-Josiah Bought 200 acres Ogeechee Rev. Grant pg. 43 Warren Co Ga.
1784-Jul 17- Josiah bought land- and had survey done for 600 acres Warren Co. Ga.
1784-Apr. 6 Richmond Co Ga Josiah swears he has never received any land grants and that he has exclusive of
himself and wife, seven children and eight negros.
Josiah signed deed.
1784-Josiah received land grants-several hundred acres Wilkes Co. Ga.
1784-Jul 2-He bought 200 acres on NS of Ogeechee River from James and Sarah Harve Warren Co Ga. Pg. 43
He obtained other land in Wilkes Co - Oldest Deed page 52
Wilks Co. Ga. Misc. Records Vol II
Early Records of Ga Vol I & II List John (several) James & Josiah
1784-Jul. 21 Rachel Carter born
(A Sarah Carter Husband Elijah McMath born 1786 Wilkes-married 1822 Warren-how kin?)
Wilkes-Josiah wife Mary to James Thweatt 195 acres pg 26
EARLY RECORDS OF GA Vol 1 Davidson
Ga on July 5, 1788 and he and wife Mary sold one Ogeechee tract. From Gone to Ga Jackson and
Gwinnet Co...by National Gen Soc. Wash.DC. (A Josiah Carter had 100 acres in Bladen Co. NC
1786-Wilkes
Capt. Alex Still's Dist.
Drury Rogers #17
Josiah Carter #18 owned land Greene 935 acres 840 Wilkes
James Kendrick #19 200 Acres Wilkes-287 Washington
Absolem Bedell was a Receiver Wilkes Taxes Capt. William's Dist.
(Carter Children showed up-Thomas, James & Nancy Capt. Pullom's Dist. Pg. 117)
Thomas #18 had 800 Franklin and 2300 Wilkes
James had 400 acres Wilkes #19
Nancy (wife of?) #20 had 300 acres Wilkes
1788 Tax List.)
1784-Sep. 12 Govoner granted at least 200 acres to Josiah- (Later sold in Greene-from Wilkes)
1785- Josiah was granted 200 acres (at least) in Wilkes Co Ga. (Later a part of Greene-sold 1788)
1786- Greene Co. was formed from Washingtn, Oglethorpe and Wilkes
1786-7 Grantors Josiah Carter Deed B #1 A & B
1786-May 7- John Carter born Warren- Greene ?
1786 Jul. 1 Minutes of Powelton Bab Church 1786-1977 Ga..Josiah was charter member along with
Georga Babby, Peter Coffee, Richad Curndon, Henry Graybill, John Harvey, Levi - Warren Co. Ga.
1786-Sep 2 Mary Carter joins Powelton Baptish Church
1786-9th child John Carter born-Greene Co Ga-later Warren
1788-Jan. 26 Pg. 218Josiah Carter deed-Greene Co Ga
1788-10th child Daniel Carter born-Greene Co Ga-Later Warren
(1789 Mary Kendrick born Chatham Co NC)
1787- Jul 5-Josiah bought on Ogeechee River pg. 291
1788-Nov. 20 SOME GEORGIA COUNTY RECORDS-Lucas page 179 EARLY RECORDS OF GA Vol 1
Davidson 207-208-JOSIAH CARTER (my ancestor) Of Greene Co. to THOMAS GRACE of same for
100 pds. lawful money of Ga 200 acres in Greene formerly WIlkes CO granted the said Carter 13
Oct 1785. Signed JOSIAH CARTER.
Wit. WELDON *H) OWSLEY, R. MIDDLETON JP, HENRY GRAYBILL HP
1796 7ug 6-Josiah Carter-Deed...Registered- original date 1788-Jan 26 pg 208
1790-31 Jul- pages 385-386- (SOME GA CO RECORDS) Josiah Carter and Mary Carter his wife of
Wilkes to Richard Lockheart of Greene, for 50 pds. sterling, 200 acres on Hoopole Creek, bounded
E. by Robert Harper, all other sides vacant; granted said Carter by Gov. 12 Sep 1784. Signed Josiah,
Mary Wit. Henry Graybill JP Wm Speir Reg.
1793- Deed Book A p 307 7-23-1793 Wilkes Co Ga
Know ye, that I the said Josiah Carter of the county of Wilkes and State of Georgia for and in
consideration of the love, good will and affection which I have and do beaar towards my loving
daughter Elizabeth Henderson, wife of Jsmes Henderson of the same County and State grant until
the said James Henderson his heirs and assigns forever containig two hundred acres (be the same
more or less) Being part of twelve acres and bearing date 17th of Jul
1793- Warren Co. was formed from Wilkes, Columbia, Richmond
1794-Joseph -1st child- married Warren Co Ga
1797-Mary-4th child married Warren Co Ga
1797 Josiah in Wilkes Co. records
land to dtr. Elizabeth Henderson wife of James
1797-June-Josiah-5th child died at 19.
1807-Sarah-3rd child married Warren Co. Ga.
1809-Thomas-6th child married Putnam Co. Ga.
1811-Christopher 7th child married Warren Co Ga
1812-Rachel 8th child married Warren Co Ga
1814-Judith 13th child married Warren Co Ga
1815- Daniel 10th child married Warren Co Ga
1819-Nancy 11th child married Putnam Co Ga
1819-Lottery-orphans of John Carter 1 Draw Pg. 334 EARLY RECORDS OF GA Vol 1 Davidson
1820-Census Josiah - Warren 299
1822-10 Sep- Josiah Carter died Putnam Co. Ga.
Tuesday September 24 1822 Died-In Putnam County on the 1t0 instant, at Mr. Charles Denham's, Mr. Josiah
Carter of Warren County in the 79th year of his age. He was one of the old Revolutionaries of '76. He has
been a member of the Baptist Church for about 20 years- SOurce GH PUTNAM COUNTY EXTRACTS Vol 1 1809-
1834
1830 Putnam James 191
1832-Gold Lottery Wilkes John T 1 Capt. Campbell's Dist EARLY RECORDS OF GA Vol 1 Davidson
1832-Wilkes Co Ga- Orphans of Josiah-Cherokee Purchase EARLY RECORDS OF GA Vol 1 Davidson


I don't want to monopolize the Sansom genforum, but this Sarah Ann Carter, in my mind, is/has got to be somehow related to Joseph Carter, whose wife was said to be a girl named Frances Winn/Wynne. The Carter association with the family has also got to come from perhaps the line of Josiah Carter and Mary Anthony, although how is beyond my immediate scope of knowledge. Josiah Carter in his bible has a death of a Martha Sanson in it. I assume this is a wife of James Sansom, who died in 1793. I am just guessing and have no firm proof of it. This Martha Sanson (sic-Sansom) died in 1837 "in her 80th (or 20th) year from January". Jacob Sansom of Greene and Jasper Co., Ga. owned land jointly with a Joseph Carter. This land seems to have been deeded to Carter by a William Melton, prior to Melton's move to Alabama, by the deed. Jacob Sansom's land is later sold by Micajah Sansom, Sr. From a newpaper article in 1810, there is a Sherrif's sale for the first Tuesday in May, next (March 27, 1810 article) will be sold at the usual hours of sale aat Monticello
101 1/4 acres of land being part of lot 132 in the 17th district of formerly Baldwin but now Randolph Co., levied on as the property of Jacob Sansom and Joseph Carter to satisfy sundry executions against them". This area called Randolph Co., Ga. was later Jasper Co., Ga. The Anthony family is related by marriage to the following families:
Kilgore-William Sansom md. Delphia Clay in 1806 Greene Co., Ga.---Delphia is a d/o
Nathan Clay and Ann Kilgore (who was a d/o William Kilgore).
Stinson-William H. Sansom, son of Micajah Sansom Sr., md. Nancy Stinson. George Stinson of Wilkes Co., Ga. had a daughter who md. Mark Anthony of this Anthony line.
Carter-Josiah Carter married Mary Anthony, whose son, Christopher Anthony Carter-lives in household next door to Dolles "Dolly" Gibson Sansom, 1830 Newton Co., Ga. and widow of Micajah, Sr. Quite a mix up and why nobody ever gets untangled?

I have always wondered if the Jacob Sansom, who was with Joseph Carter, is perhaps the father of John L. Sansom. Their association with a Burwell Rogers (per letter of William Carter Sansom to wife Matt)who lived next door takes me back a long way to Ga. deeds in late 1790's with the Sansoms and Burwell Rogers--early Greene Co., Ga.Molly McLaughlin on GenForum Sansom bd.



There is a William Carter on one bit of material I rec. ..son of Josiah, born ca 1791 Ga m Mary Williams in Franklin Co NC went to Ms then to Lafayette Co Ark. She died 1845 in Lafayette Co Ark..William d 1850's...in Pike Co Ark. Son Henry William Carter lived and died in Pike Co Ark...Jo An Roberson Nashville Ark.

One DAR # is 579918.

Served as a private in Ga Line under Col Elijah Clark..Georgia Roster of Rev. P 378 copied from papers in office of Sec of State..Private Josiah Carter.
He bought land on Ogeechee River July 2, 1784 from James and Sarah Harvey. He
obtained other land in Wilkes Co Ga on July 5, 1788 and he and wife Mary sold
one Ogeechee tract. From Gone to Ga Jackson and Gwinnet Co...by National Gen
Soc. Wash.DC. (A Josiah Carter had 100 acres in Bladen Co. NC 1788 Tax List.)
From THWEATT FAMILY HISTORY page 76 Deed book FF 1788 p 28 Josiah Carter and
wife Mary to James Thweatt 195 acres on Ogeechee River original grant 1787 to
said Josiah dated 5 Jul 1778.
Henry Co. formed 1776 from Bedford and Pitts. Deed Jul 31 1778 to Josiah Carter and Baynes Carter...land Grant Oct 20 1778 to Josiah Carter on both sides of Blackwater River.
Va Tax Payers Henry Co 1782-87 Josiah Carter 6 slaves
1784 Jul. 17..He had a survey done on 600 acres Warren Co. Ga.
1786 Jul. 1 Minutes of Powelton Bap Church 1786-1977 Ga..Josiah was charter member
along with Georga Babby, Peter Coffee, Richad Curndon, Henry Graybill, John Harvey, Levi
Lancaster, Sarah Lancaster, William Maddox, Holland Middleton, Aaron, Ann, Daniel, Richard, Rith,
Sarah and Susannah Parker, Jesse, Mary and Nancy Pope, Mathew and Sarah Rabun, William
Ramsay, Ann & William Spiers.
1787 Sep. 2 Mary Carter joined. Oct. 6 Elizabeth joined by Experience.
Rachel and Nancy joined 2 Sep 1809, James joined 2 Dec 1809, Josiah joined 2 Oct 1822, Mary died 5 Oct 1820. Rachel left by letter 30 Jul 1813, Nancy left by letter 18 Jul 1819, James left 1 Jan 1825 by letter.
Powelton Bab Ch Hancock Co Ga.
(Records micro-filmed for Gen Lib Salt Lake City and Archives and Hist State of Ga, Mercer Univ. Macon Ga.)
1797 Aug. 19-Recorded..pages 307-308 (SOME GEORGIA COUNTY RECORDS Vol 1 Lucas
pg 227) Josiah Carter of Wilkes for love, good will and affection to my
dtr. Elizabeth Henderson wife of James of same Co. 200 acres part of
survey for sd. Carter of 600 acres Jul. 17, 1784, and part of a survey of
Apr. 9, 1793 beginning at Frazer's Hickory corner, on e s of N fork of
Walker's Branch..David Lockett's line, William Dismukes line..Josiah
Carter (seal) Wit. John Veazey, John Wynne JP Rec. Warren Co. Ga.
Index to Headrights and Bounty Grants of Ga 1756-1909
17 land grants listed total of 4142 acres in 6 counties to Josiah Carter..two in Burke may have been son Josiah Jr.

Rev Serv Va Mag of Hist & Bio VOl p p 17 Henry Co Va among the persons who took the Oath of Allegience before Edmond Lynn Esq 30 Aug 1777 were Josiah and brother Baynes. Vol I p334 Specific taxes Aug 1780 Henry sold at Court House..Served as Pvt Ga line under Col Elujah Clark. Certified List of Rev Sol Land Lottery Grants. Early History of Ga Wilkes Co by Davidson p 237 Josiah bought 200 acres n side of Ogeechee River 2 Jul 1784.
1788 20 Nov. pg. 207-208 Greene Co. Records Josiah Carter of Greene to Thomas Grace of same for 100 pds lawful money of Ga. 200 acres in Greene formerly Wilkes granted to said Carter 13 Oct 1785. Signed Josiah Carter Wit. Weldon Oswley, E Middleton JP Hen Graybill JP
1790 31 Jul Page 385-386 Greene Co. Records. Josiah Carter and Mary Carter his wife of Wilkes Co to Richard Lockheart of Greene fo r 50 pds. 200 avees on Hoopole Creek bounded by Robert Harper all other sides vacant..granted Carter by Gov. 12 Sep 1784. Signed Josiah and Mary Wit Henry Graybill JP Wm Spier Reg.
FROM DAR headquarters in Apr. 643728 A 641 Virginia Kendall Preston (Mrs.
James Edward Jr.) 937 Warwick Dr. Macon 1984.. My Suppliment ties to...
John Carter 10 Feb 1745 Bible Rec.
son Josiah Pvt 10 Sep 1822 Goochland and Mary Anthony etc.
1796 Nov. 19 SOME GEORGIA COUNTY RECORDS Vol 1 Lucas page 224 pages 270-1 James Rogers of Warren Co (Ga) to Josiah Carter of same for 17 lbs. 2 shillings and six pence land on Ogechee 10 acres. With James Henderson, Thos.Poore,Wm.Byrom Jr. Rev. May 23 1797
1822 Sep. 24 Tues. Died in Putnam Co. on 10th instant at Mrs. Charles Denham's Josiah Carter of Warren Co. in
79th year of his age. He was one of the old Rev. of 76. He has been a member of the Baptist Church for
about 40 years. Source G.J.

Mr. Josiah Carter 79 years died 9-10-1822 Putnam Co. Ga. SGC 10-3-1822 (Georgian for County-Savannah)

Here's some more drawers for Land District #30 ....
don't know if they sold the land or actually came here.

30 240 Chrosbay, Elizabeth
30 141 Conner, Early
30 154 Coelman, John sen.
30 127 Corly, Frederick
30 174 Cobb, Joseph E. ille
30 244 Cooper, Mary hus. ab
30 222 Cochran, Cheadle
30 251 Cash, Henry
30 177 Cheeves, Thomas
30 200 Cousins, Adam R.S.
30 35 Cheek, John
30 203 Cochran, William
30 49 Calef, Letitia wido
30 115 Cole, Caroline orph
30 116 Carter, Josiah H.
30 216 Cawley, James W.
30 99 Care, James
30 182 Cox, William
30 165 Cannon, Nathan'l RS

EARLY RECORDS OF GA Vol I Davidson-
Josiah 236,7,91,350
Mary 291
Nancy M 258
John 45, 93,107,133
John C 93
John M 129,131,141,142
T 331,351,75,93


WILKES CO GA MARRIAGE RECORDS 1792-1832 only 1
Marriages-Wilkes other dates.
Elijah & Cinn Cofer 7-20-1828
Herrod & Elizaabeth Atkins 8-23-`793
John G & Amelia SMith 8-15-1819
Joseph & Eliz. Watts 8-23-1793
Nelson & Betsy Johnson 8-15-1806
Wm. & Eliz. Stroud 8-23-1814
Reuben (2)
Rebecca
Philip
Nancy
Mary J
Lewis
Joseph A Rev.
John W-another John
R.J.
John C
James
George W
Fanny (Col)
F. Alston
Emily L

DNA test-being done Dick Carter took part-lkylnde@cableone.net 45059 Josiah, Th, Th Jr- only possible match was Giles Ms Gerry HillAlbany Ga
There is a bible for this Family-Still in existance. Copy at Ga Archives. Copy in Randy Malone's book-etc.
Thanks for the information on the Carter line...was hoping you might know back to Va. I'm researching my fifth great grandparents b. c. 1728 (Joseph Irby) and "Mary" Frances Carter b. c. 1727 or after. They lived both in Halifax Co. Va and Halifax/Edgecombe Co., NC. In 1778 they moved from Halifax Co., VA to Newberry Co. (District 96 at the time), SC. They had been married several years at that time.

RSS

Members

Badge

Loading…

© 2021   Created by Nat Ins for Genealogical Studies.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service