Genealogy Wise

The Genealogy & Family History Social Network

Tell about your favorite free or low-cost genealogy resources, online and off. Explain why it's a favorite and how it's been helpful in your research.

Views: 1905

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Created my own Data Sheet and then started to go to all the "tiny" reunions (20 or less in attendance) still in my area. This lead to the joining of all the tiny reunions into a large one. Ended up with 3000 data sheets and in 1999 published the 1200+ page book on the Peter Loucks-Anna Barkey's 12 children and their descendants.
Attachments:
who did you use as a publisher? I am wanting to do something similar and want to be able to print some rtf files as well.'
I guess NEHGS isn't exactly free. So I'd have to say Google books, books.google.com, instead. It's a wonderful source.
This sounds like a great book and the data sheet looks like a great tool. thanks for sharing

Ginger Loucks said:
Created my own Data Sheet and then started to go to all the "tiny" reunions (20 or less in attendance) still in my area. This lead to the joining of all the tiny reunions into a large one. Ended up with 3000 data sheets and in 1999 published the 1200+ page book on the Peter Loucks-Anna Barkey's 12 children and their descendants.
Thanks for the Data Sheet. I love collecting all types of genealogy forms - yours is a keeper. I'm sure I will make great use of it.

Ginger Loucks said:
Created my own Data Sheet and then started to go to all the "tiny" reunions (20 or less in attendance) still in my area. This lead to the joining of all the tiny reunions into a large one. Ended up with 3000 data sheets and in 1999 published the 1200+ page book on the Peter Loucks-Anna Barkey's 12 children and their descendants.
I love ILL, and have been allowed to check out (for a minimum of 2 weeks, though many won't allow renewals) several very helpful books this way.

Miriam Robbins Midkiff said:
One of my favorite resources is Inter-Library Loan (ILL). When I can't find a genealogy book, magazine, or resource at my local library or online, many times I can order it through ILL. I usually can't bring it home when it arrives; must use it at my library branch, but I can make photocopies or take pix with my digital camera for future use.
The USGenWeb sites deserve a mention - they've been a tremendous help to me. Also, I've really appreciated the Illinois State Archives Database and the Dibean Marriage Index (Michigan).
I second the USGenWeb sites. Some have more info than others, but I have found them extremely useful.
DeadFred gets my vote for a great site. A huge collection of old photos, some identified, others are unknown. http://www.deadfred.com/ These folks post and organize in a searchable database all photos. You can search by surname or location. Twice I've been contacted by folks who knew who is in two of mystery photos. The option to be contacted by others who may be related, or who have additional info on your photo is there.
Wow...where to start?

When I realized my southern Ohio relatives spent a lot of their time across the state lines in West Virginia, I became a huge fan of the West Virginia Vital Records Search -

Many generations of Ohio ancestors makes the Ohio death certificates available at the Family Search site a must!

Another great source for locating obituary (& other info) on your Ohio ancestors is the RB Hayes Obituary Index -
The family history pilot project is a must for early 20th century ohio death certificates as they are digitized.
I love the West Virginia website. That's how I found my Greatgrandfather's death cert. I found a lot of information about my ancestors on there.

RSS

Members

Badge

Loading…

© 2019   Created by Nat Ins for Genealogical Studies.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service